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Posted: March 22, 2018 11:47 a.m.
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DES Corner

Distracted driving increases with technology

We have all experienced it one way or another: You are at a red light, and when the light turns green, two or three vehicles proceed forward, but one car remains; it might as well be parked there. The driver was so involved in texting that he or she did not realize the light was green and was now impeding traffic flow.  Not only can impeding traffic instigate road rage, but texting while driving is against the law on the installation. Fort Stewart 32 CFR 634.25 (c) (3) prohibits the use of cell phone and other electronic devices while operating a motor vehicle. The information is at each gate. 

 There are three types of distracted driving:

Visual: Taking your eyes off the road.

Manual: Taking your hands off the wheel.

Cognitive: Taking your mind off what you’re doing.

 Distracteddriveraccidents.com notes some of the chief causes for accidents. The site notes:

• Over 2.5 million people in the United States are involved in road accidents each year. The population of the US is just 318.9 million.

• Of these, 1.6 million have a cell phone involved. That is 64 percent of all the road accidents in the United States. Over half the road accidents in the United States have cell phones involved, and if this doesn’t make you realize just how potent it is, what will?

• Every year, about 421,000 people are injured in crashes that have involved a driver who was distracted in some way.

• Each year, over 330,000 accidents caused by texting while driving lead to severe injuries. This means that over 78 percent of all distracted drivers are distracted because they have been texting while driving.

• One out of four car accidents in the U.S. is caused by texting while driving.

• Texting and driving are six times more likely to get you in an accident than drunk driving. That’s right; it is actually safer for someone to get drunk and get behind the wheel than to text and do it.

Please think about and discuss with any new drivers in your family.  Set the example for them if you need to answer your phone (without hands-free devices); pull over to a safe place and stop your vehicle.


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