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Posted: June 8, 2018 3:52 p.m.
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3rd ID revisits history

Sgt. 1st Class Faiza Evans/

A select group of Soldiers of the 3rd Infantry Division visited the Montfaucon American Monument May 24, while participating in the World War I Centennial in France. The monument towers more than 200 feet above the ruined former village, destroyed during the Meuse Argonne offensive, Sept. 26 to Nov. 11, 1918, and commemorates the American victory. On the walls of the foyer, is an engraved map of the operations with a narrative and tribute to the U.S. troops who served there. Soldiers climbed ...

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The 3rd Infantry Division command team, Maj. Gen. Lee Quintas and Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel Hendrex and 27 select Soldiers throughout the division, took part in the commemoration activates for the World War I Centennial in France, May 23-29.

The week-long event was organized by the U.S. Center of Military History. The commemoration aim was to honor the Soldiers who participated in the war and marks 100 years since the U.S. involvement in the conflict. The 3rd Infantry Division fought in several campaigns in France during the First World War and through the units, tenacity, earned the motto "Rock of the Marne." 

The Soldiers had the opportunity to learn the rich and storied history of the Marne Division's significant actions in the war and visited the Montfaucon American Monument and Meuse Argonne American Cemetery and Monument in Montfaucon d'Argonne, France May 24.

The Montfaucon Monument towers more than 200 feet above the ruined former village, destroyed during the Meuse Argonne offensive, September 26, 1918, to November 11, 1918, and commemorates the American Victory in pushing back the German Army. 

"The village of Montfaucon was actually on the hill where the monument is. When you walk around the area now, you can see the ruins of the old village, which was destroyed," said Dr. Brian Newman, historian, U.S. Center of Military History.

Newman said the capturing the village of Montfaucon was of great importance to the U.S. forces because it was the high ground in the center of the American frontage. 

It was imperative the U.S. Army take in the center of the battlefield to continue their advance. 

Newman said the fight was brutal and the U.S. Soldiers take heavy casualties. 

"The tower is there to memorialize and mark the sacrifice and accomplishment of the American Army during the Meuse Argonne, which was the largest battle in American history," Newman said. "1.2 million American Soldiers were engaged in what was a 47-day battle."



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